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Crops & Varieties: Purslane

Until recently, purslane has been considered a weed in North America. Perhaps that's because it grows like one -- it loves hot, dry climates, and can be somewhat pervasive in gardens and lawns. However, it's a tasty, extremely nutritious food that shouldn't be overlooked! The highest non-fish source of Omega 3 acids (heads up, vegans!), high in vitamins A and C, and minerals, purslane can be a nutritional powerhouse in your summer cooking.

The New York Times wrote about purslane in 2006. Read the article here.


Quick tips

Generally eaten raw, purslane's peppery, slightly sour taste can take a salad to the next level. 

Try purslane as the green in your potato salad or slaw recipe.

Eat smaller stems along with the leaves; larger stems may be a bit on the tough side. 

Try juicing it!


Storage

Like most greens, wrap purslane in a damp paper towel and store it in a plastic bag in your fridge. 

Alternately, place purslane in a jar in the fridge with the stems in a small amount of water.
 

Recipes

Sippity Sup: Spicy Purslane salad with tomato, cucumber, mint and parsley

Hawberry.net: Purslane pancakes

Diary of a Locavore: Purslane potato salad

The Examiner: Huevos con verdolagas (eggs with purslane)

CSA Newsletter - Week 20 | Summer 2July 15th, 2014

Moving on, what makes our tomatoes special, squash notes

Major news from Tomato MountainJune 29th, 2014

An extreme hail storm and possible tornado (still under investigation) hit Tomato Mountain this past week, and we're still in the process of recovering. Winds upwards of 100mp

CSA Newsletter, Week 15 | Spring 9June 11th, 2014

Scallions |||   Red Rain mustard greens   |||   Red Russian Kale   |||   Lettuce   |||   Rainbow chard   ||| &

Have a Question?

Contact Us Online or Call 608-335-1198

Tomato Mountain Farm ~ N7720 Sandy Hook Rd, Brooklyn WI 53521 ~ info@tomatomountain.com ~ 608.712.1585

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